Campbell Mansion

A National Historic Landmark

5776Dsc0422.jpg


The Campbell Home, home to Alexander Campbell, was built in four stages between 1795 and 1840 and offered religion and southern hospitality in abundance. This farmstead was home to at least 20 people in the early 1840s and the visitors were so numerous that 32 chairs often stood ready in the dining room.


The household gathered for worship twice a day in the old parlor. The cook prepared hearty meals for extended family and guests. Guests in the Campbell home included Jefferson Davis, future president of the Confederacy; James A. Garfield, trustee of Bethany College, president of Bethany’s daughter institution, Hiram College, and future president of the United States; and Judge Jeremiah Black, U.S. attorney general under President James Buchanan.

2629campbellstudy.jpg

“Strangers Hall,” with its 19th century French scenic wallpaper, Campbell’s hexagonal brick study, aschoolroom and gardens still welcome guests today.

The home was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970, restored in 1989 and registered as a National Historic Landmark in 1994.

Alexander Campbell prepared lectures, sermons and the "Millennial Harbinger" in this hexagonal study located near his home.