Bethany College Presents Senior Art Exhibit 

BETHANY, W.Va. – The annual Bethany College Senior Art Show is now open in the College’s Renner Art Gallery. The exhibit, which features the work of Kelsey Bish of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Harrison Rightmyer, of Reading, Pennsylvania, will be available until April 18.

Kelsey Bish is the daughter of Francis and Carmen Bish. She is a double major in visual arts and Spanish, hoping to successfully earn her second bachelor’s degree in January 2016. Kelsey is also a member of two academic honorary fraternities, Kappa Pi and Sigma Delta Pi. Within the senior exhibit, Kelsey said she hopes to show her strengths in three-dimensional and ceramic art.

Harrison Rightmyer, son of Keith and Becky Rightmyer, is a visual arts major. He is a brother of the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. He considers paints to be his strongest medium to work with and his favorite to use. 

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Their interesting two- and three-dimensional pieces show influence by their love of sports, according to Kenn Morgan, Professor of Fine Arts and Director of the Renner Art Gallery. Bish and Rightmyer are both student-athletes: Bish is the pitcher for the College’s softball team, and Rightmyer is the baseball team’s pitcher.

“Both Kelsey and Harrison are dedicated athletes who have made a positive impact on our campus community,” said Aaron Anslow, Assistant Professor of Fine Arts. “I look forward to seeing these two go out into the world to establish themselves as young artists."

A public reception will be held in honor of the artists on Saturday, April 18, from 8 to 9:30 p.m. in the Renner Art Gallery.

The Senior Art Show has served as art majors’ senior project requirement, which must be completed before graduation, for many years. 

Bethany, a small college of national distinction, is located on a picturesque and historic 1,300-acre campus. Bethany, the oldest degree granting institution in West Virginia, was founded in 1840 and traces its origins to the founding of Buffalo Seminary in 1818 at what was then Bethany, Virginia.